Know Your City’s Trees! June Contest

Where in South Boston are these trees? These two trees seem to be dead or dying. While the tree in the left background is in full bloom, the two foreground trees still have no leaves. This picture was taken in early May, long after leaves and buds appeared across South Boston.

In the city and in natural ecosystems, trees die for various reasons. It could have to do with hydration, trauma, tree disease, or other factors. Southie Trees, a project of TNB, has applied for a grant to track urban tree outcomes using open-source software called iTree.

Tech Networks of Boston supports the preservation of mature urban trees, which make neighborhoods more pleasant, filter our air and water, and moderate temperatures.  We hope you’ll use this contest as a fun way to get to know your city’s trees!

Click here to read the full June newsletter.

Know Your City’s Trees! May Contest

Where in South Boston was this tree? This month we’re featuring a recent historical photo. We’ve featured a mix of urban trees, mostly around South Boston and some in other neighborhoods. You might need to really know South Boston to win this month’s contest! This famous tree, which gave joy to many in Southie, was struck by lightning a few years ago. This scene shows the tree soon after it was struck.

Urban trees serve many roles at once: beautification, recreation, noise reduction, improving air quality and protecting the environment. Above all, they make neighbors happy.

Tech Networks of Boston supports the preservation of mature urban trees, which make neighborhoods more pleasant, filter our air and water, and moderate temperatures. We hope you’ll use this contest as a fun way to get to know your city’s trees!

Click here to view the full May 2012 Boston Techie newsletter.

Know Your City’s Trees! April Contest

Where in South Boston is this tree?  This is a good example of a larger, mature street tree.  Even without its leaves in the winter, it lends a pleasant natural canopy to a street scene that otherwise is largely paved over.

Street trees require regular care as they are outside their natural habitat.  Tree pits (those small patches of soil where street trees are planted) need to be cleaned, weeded and aerated.

Tech Networks of Boston supports the preservation of mature urban trees, which make neighborhoods more pleasant, filter our air and water, and moderate temperatures.  We hope you’ll use this contest as a fun way to get to know your city’s trees!

Click here to read the full Boston Techie.

Know Your City’s Trees! March Contest

Where in South Boston is this tree? This tree is in the process of being cut in a lopsided manner as part of a construction project. In Massachusetts, the cutting of any shade tree on a public way requires a permit, which can only be issued after a public hearing (see Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 87, Section 3).

Tech Networks of Boston supports the preservation of mature urban trees, which make neighborhoods more pleasant, filter our air and water, and moderate temperatures.

We hope you’ll use this contest as a fun way to get to know your city’s trees!

Click here to read the full March 2012 Boston Techie newsletter.

Know Your City’s Trees! February Contest

Where in Cambridge is this tree? Have you seen a lot of trees with their leaves still on this year? This natural phenomenon is called marcescence. The tree shown at right is a pin oak undergoing this process, which is the retention of leaves or other parts that would be expected to fall off. It is not uncommon for oaks to show marcescence, which may have evolutionary advantages.

Tech Networks of Boston supports the preservation of mature urban trees, which make neighborhoods more pleasant, filter our air and water, and moderate temperatures. It’s one of the ways trees are adapting to our warming climate.

We hope you’ll use this contest as a fun way to get to know your city’s trees!

Know Your City’s Trees

Where in South Boston is this tree? Account Manager David Tenofsky is standing by a Christmas tree somewhere in Southie. The first reader to guess its location will receive a free gift.

A staggering 33 million trees are sold in North America every year for Christmas. Today, as a carbon-neutral practice, one to three new seedlings are planted for every tree that is cut down. On the other hand, while artificial trees may appeal to us in terms of price and convenience, many of these trees are non-recyclable and destined to centuries in a landfill.

The most environmentally responsible Christmas tree option is a small, organically grown natural tree, recycled into mulch after use.

Know Your City’s Trees! December Contest


Where in South Boston are these trees? The first reader to guess their location will receive a free gift.

Last month, Southie Trees arranged a tree planting in South Boston, to implement a grant from Grow Boston Greener to plant four flowering cherry trees. Many South Boston residents and businesses supported the event.

Tech Networks of Boston supports the preservation of mature urban trees, which make neighborhoods more pleasant, filter our air and water, and moderate temperatures. Let’s save the trees entrusted to us by past generations, and plant new ones for the future.

We hope you’ll use this contest as a fun way to get to know your city’s trees!

Know Your City’s Trees! November Contest

Where in Andrew Square is this tree? The first reader to guess its location will receive a free gift.

This month we’re featuring a young street tree. With harsh conditions and scant access to water, street trees like this one live an average of only 8 years. They never grow large enough to provide shade or beautify the street.

Tech Networks of Boston supports the preservation of mature urban trees, which make neighborhoods more pleasant, filter our air and water, and moderate temperatures. Let’s save the decades-old trees entrusted to us by past generations.

We hope you’ll use this contest as a fun way to get to know your city’s trees!

Know Your Southie Trees! October Contest

Where in South Boston is this tree? The first reader to guess its location will receive a free gift. Hint: this tree is a Northern red oak, located near TNB’s main office in Andrew Square.

Tech Networks of Boston supports the preservation of mature urban trees, which make neighborhoods more pleasant, filter our air and water, and moderate temperatures. We hope you’ll use this contest as a fun way to get to know your city’s trees!

Working Together to Save South Boston’s Trees

NB staffer Jennifer Brundage spends her mornings working with Southie Trees and Action for Boston Community Development (ABCD) to advocate for the preservation of trees throughout South Boston. Jen helps the youth workers at ABCD to compare architectural drawings with trees present, taking scientific measurements and entering them into a database.

Jen has produced an up-to-date inventory of all trees in the Old Colony housing community, which is now being redeveloped. Advocates will use this tree inventory to educate the community and the Boston Housing Authority about the importance of preserving them.

Urban Trees in Perspective: Can you guess where the photo above was taken? Hint: it’s within a few blocks of Andrew Square. E-mail jennifer.brundage@techboston.com with your guess!